Presentation medical and nursing services

sohateb

With official license of hygiene ،treatment & medical education ministry

Sunday , August 9 , 2020

Latest News :


Expert bedsores

 

Bedsores and Pressure Ulcers Expert

 

 

 

What is a pressure ulcer?

 

Pressure ulcers, also known as decubitus ulcers or bedsores, are localized injuries to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in combination with shear and/or friction.  Most commonly they are found on the sacrum, coccyx, heels or the hips, but other sites such as the elbows, knees, ankles, or the back of the cranium can be affected.  They range in severity from mild (minor skin reddening, Stage I) to severe (deep craters down to muscle and bone, Stage IV).

 

Expert witnesses who are board certified by the American Academy of wound management as a certified would specialist are frequently called upon to testify as to the potential breaches in the standard of care.

 

Breaches of Standards of Care

 

Here are two examples of breaches of the standard of care.

 

First: Failing to prevent an avoidable pressure sore;

 

Example: An 80 year old lady in a nursing home develops a red area, then a blister on the buttocks. Although the nursing staff notes this while she is being bathed, they do nothing about it. The sores get worse and 10 days later there is a large open wound with yellow drainage and odor, typical of infection. The lady ends up in the hospital, sick and septic. She requires operative treatment, but eventually dies of sepsis (blood infection).

 

Example: A 76 year old man admitted for “rehabilitation” after a heart attack, sits in his wheelchair almost all day. He develops red areas on his buttocks, and should be limited to no more than 60 minutes at a time in his wheelchair. He should also be given a gel cushion for the time he does spend in the wheelchair. These simple measures are not done and he goes on to develop serious and infected buttocks sores. The sores require operative care, which is dangerous in view of his recent heart attack

 

Second: Failing to properly treat the patient’s pressure ulcers once they developed;

 

Example: A 65 year old stroke patient develops a sacral ulcer.

 

No appropriate treatment is prescribed, even though she is turned frequently. The ulcer becomes bigger and infected, requiring operative intervention, but it never heals due to the underlying sacral bone getting infected (osteomyelitis), which is almost always incurable.

 

Relevant Standards of Care for healthcare providers in Hospitals, and Nursing Homes

 

Attorneys and the expert witnesses who are called upon to evaluate bedsores and pressure ulcer claims have established and codified standards of care at their disposal.

 

Prevent Avoidable Pressure Ulcers. Medicare and Medicaid provide rules that require long term care facilities to provide a base level of care.  Failure to meet the level of care provided by the rules found in 42 CFR 483, Subpart B is a violation of the regulations intended to protect residents.  It is also an indication of a violation of the standard of care by the staff of the facility and the administration of the facility.  Section 483.25(c)(1) provides that a facility and its nurses ensure that a resident who is admitted without pressure sores does not develop pressure sores unless the individual’s clinical condition demonstrates that the sores were unavoidable and that a resident who develops pressure sores receives necessary treatment and services to promote healing, prevent infection, and prevent new sores from developing.  The purpose of this is to prevent residents from getting pressure ulcers and to promote behavior that allows for the healing of decubitus ulcers.  There are a number of interventions that exist to prevent pressure sores that are identified and explained in more detail below.  For example, the standard of care requires that a patient be turned, provided with pressure relieving devices, be kept clean and dry, and be kept properly nourished.  The standard of care also requires that a patient receive frequent head-to-toe body examinations to look for early signs of skin problems.

 

One additional source regarding the standard of care is the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel.  The NPUAP is a collection of experts tasked with creating treatment algorithms that show the proper method for preventing pressure ulcers.  In 2009, the NPUAP published a 26-page reference guide on how to prevent pressure ulcers. This reference guide, which is available under the educational and clinical resources tab of the NPUAP website (www.npuap.org), provides a detailed description of what the standard of care requires.

 

The NPUAP identifies what health care providers in hospitals and nursing homes should address when caring for a patient at risk of developing pressure ulcers:

 

    Pressure ulcer risk assessment: The standard of care requires health care providers to conduct a structured risk assessment on admission and as frequently and as regularly required based on patient acuity.  In addition, health care providers should reassess the patient’s risk level if the patient has a change in condition.  The purpose of the assessments is to gauge the patient’s risk of developing a pressure ulcer and to ensure a proper plan of care is implemented to prevent a pressure ulcer from developing.

 

    Skin assessment: Likewise, the standard of care requires health care providers to perform assessments to determine the integrity of the patient’s skin and to determine whether a change in the care plan is necessary.  Skin assessments should be performed regularly, although the frequency of inspection may need to be increased if there is any deterioration in the patient’s overall condition.

 

    Skin care: The standard of care requires providers to care for the skin in a manner that prevents breakdowns.  This includes, for example, not turning a patient onto a body part that is still reddened from a previous episode of pressure loading.

 

    Nutrition: Because a decline in nutritional status can lead to skin breakdown, the standard of care requires providers to ensure patients are receiving adequate nutrition.  This includes offering high-protein supplements and/or tube feeding, in addition to the usual diet, to patients with nutritional risk.  It is important that health care providers communicate with the dietary team to ensure the patient does not become malnourished.

 

    Repositioning: The standard of care also requires providers to frequently and regularly reposition patients to prevent sustained pressure being applied to the same part of the body for an extended period of time.

 

    Mattress and bed use: Because special devices can also offload pressure to parts of the body, the standard of care requires providers to install special devices, such as low air mattresses, for high-risk residents.

 

    Support surfaces while seated: For high-risk patients, the standard of care requires health care providers to consider and use support surfaces, such as wheelchair gel cushions, to offload pressure to parts of the body while the patient is seated.

 

Failing to do any of the above is a breach of the standard of care.

 

Once the patient has developed a bedsore or pressure ulcer, attorneys and expert witnesses have well defined standards of care for treatment as well.

 

Properly treat pressure ulcers.  The standard of care also requires that a resident who has pressure sores must receive the necessary treatment and services to promote healing and prevent infection. This standard of care is supported by Title 42, Code of Federal Regulations, Section 483.25(c)(2).  The purpose of this requirement is to promote behavior that allows for the healing of decubitus ulcers.  There are a number of interventions that exist to promote healing and prevent further skin breakdown.  For example, the standard of care requires that a patient be positioned so that pressure on the ulcer is relieved, the patient is kept clean and dry, and the patient is provided with adequate nutrition to support healing.  The pressure ulcer and surrounding skin should also be cleansed at the time of each dressing change.  Appropriate dressing and treatments should be used, or the ulcer is unlikely to heal.  The standard of care also requires that a facility and its nurses intervene such that a patient who has ulcers heals.  The standard of care also requires that regular and complete assessments be performed and documented so that the necessary interventions can be implemented.  Failing to do any of the above is a breach of the standard of care.

 

In general, the facility must have sufficient staff to provide 24-hour nursing and related services to attain or maintain the highest practicable physical, mental and psychosocial well-being of each resident, as determined by resident assessments and individualized plans of care.  When treating a patient with a high risk of developing pressure ulcers, a facility and its agents must properly and regularly assess the patient, including daily and complete skin assessments, proper documentation of the patient’s daily activities, and monitoring the patient’s body weight. Such accurate and complete documentation is necessary to properly gauge whether the current treatment plan is working. If not, the plan needs to be modified or changed. In addition, staffing levels should reflect the complexity of the care required, the size of the facility, and the type of services delivered. This means that the training, selection, and supervision of the staff must be sufficient to handle the nursing care that is needed by the residents who are accepted into the facility.

 

The history behind nursing home regulations informs about their purpose.  In the past, most nurses in nursing homes had little or no formal training in gerontology and long-term care. Many nursing home attendants or aides had no formal training.  In 1986, only 17 states had mandated training requirements for nursing attendants, and there were no federal standards for training. In a 1986 study, conducted at the request of Congress, the Institute of Medicine found that residents of nursing homes were being abused, neglected, and given inadequate care. The Institute of Medicine proposed sweeping reforms, most of which became law in 1987 with the passage of the Nursing Home Reform Act, part of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987. The basic objective of the Nursing Home Reform Act was to ensure that residents of nursing homes received quality care that resulted in their achieving or maintaining their “highest practicable” physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being.

 

Implement The Nursing Home Reform Act of 1987. To secure quality care in nursing homes, the Nursing Home Reform Act requires the provision of certain services to each resident and establishes a Residents’ Bill of Rights.  Nursing homes receive Medicaid and Medicare payments for long-term care of residents only if they are certified by the state to be in substantial compliance with the requirements of the Nursing Home Reform Act.  The purpose of these reforms was to ensure that facilities had sufficient staff that was sufficiently trained and supervised to provide quality care to the residents.  Such training and supervision are especially important when it comes to care of dependent residents. Failing to have a staff that is sufficiently trained and supervised, which includes the facilities policies as well as the implementation of those policies, to attain and maintain the highest practicable physical, mental and psychosocial well-being of the residents is a violation of the standard of care applicable to nursing homes.

 

Bedsore and wound care expert witnesses look to see if the Nursing Home Reform Act of 1987 is followed and implemented.